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Wednesday, 09 November 2016 00:00

New Cybersecurity curriculum now available

Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (November 9, 2016) – A newly published Cybersecurity Curriculum is now available for institutions interested in implementing cybersecurity education programs, in order to better protect their networks from cybersecurity threats.

Published in News

Riga, Latvia (May 2, 2016) -- The Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Working Group, sponsored by the Partnership for Peace Consortium (PfPC) at the George C. Marshall Center in Garmisch, Germany, met from 25 - 27 April 2016 in Riga, Latvia. This workshop meeting, graciously hosted by the Latvian National Defence Academy, saw approximately 40 participants from 14 countries in attendance.

Published in News

Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (June 11, 2015) – The Partnership for Peace Consortium (PfPC) is holding their 17th Annual Conference in Vienna, Austria, from 1-3 July. In light of ongoing turmoil in Ukraine and elsewhere, some 120 experts from around the globe are gathering to help make sense of the world’s turbulent times and provide constructive recommendations on how to reduce conflict through cooperation.

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Chisinau, Moldova (May 4, 2015) – Whether you are a government agency, a commercial enterprise, or an individual, one thing is for certain: a dedicated cyber criminal has the potential to wreak havoc on the computer networks that bind the world together. With this sobering reality in mind, the Partnership for Peace Consortium (PfPC) is developing a Cyber Security Curriculum to help better defend against determined cyber adversaries.

Published in News
Each instance of communication via the Internet depends on the transfer of confidential, readily available, and authenticated information. If this information is read, altered, or forged in any way, it jeopardizes the secure and safe operation of any service depending on the transfer of data. Thus, the exploitation of data can be leveraged in ways that can have devastating effects on modern societies. The problem with a networked society is that the international conventions on the use of force fail to sufficiently safeguard the world from the instability caused by computer attacks. This article seeks to remedy the situation by defining what kinds of actions carried out via computerized networks constitute a use of armed force or armed conflict. This article applies the existing Laws of Armed Conflict (LOAC) to three cases of computer-based attacks carried out by nation-states. In doing so, the aim is to highlight the legal limitations on actions that can be taken to respond to computer attacks.
Significant changes in the global strategic landscape over the past two decades include the fall of the Iron Curtain and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, accelerated globalization, increasing reliance on digital information technologies in all aspects of life, the rise of China and India, global financial crises, the political revolutions of the Arab Spring, and the emergence of violent Islamist extremism as a key feature of the geopolitical landscape. Yet at the same time, many of the key dynamics of the international arena remain unchanged from twenty years ago, including the volatility and instability of the Middle East, the lack of development in most of Africa, the ever-increasing integration of the global economy, and the preeminence of the United States as an actor in global affairs, with other states, such as the United Kingdom, Germany, and Russia also playing key roles. Among all that has changed and all that remains the same, new issues have emerged, few of which merit consideration in isolation. Rather, the complex and interconnected nature of today’s international system demands analysis that accounts for the relationships between actors and issues and considers the multiplicity of effects that their interaction unavoidably creates. Two key features of the current strategic environment—the two that are the focus of this article—are the indispensability of information technology in all aspects of modern life and the continued significance of Russia as an actor on the global stage. Driven by the growing dependence of modern society on digital technology and the vulnerability of digital systems to cyber threats, cybersecurity has emerged as a critical national security issue, spawning a growth industry that researches solutions to the technical, legal, and policy challenges of the day.
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